Revisiting a tragedy for The Boston Globe

This wasn't meant to be a portrait shoot, but it ended up being one. The Boston Globe asked me to travel to Binghamton, New York to paint a moody picture of the city as they revisited the 2009 shooting which grabbed national headlines at the time.

The idea was to see how a community moves forward years after an incident like this. I was tasked with making a portrait of a victim's son, photographing the location where the shooting occurred, a memorial down the street and making artistic photos of the city. 

I ended up double dipping and making a portrait of Dr. King inside the memorial (a plan editors had hoped for) and catching some beautiful sunrise light on an American icon inside the location of the shooting.

The story ended up running on the paper's Sunday edition on the A1 page. You can read the story here.

Technical notes: assignment was shot on the Canon 1DX Mark II, 35, 50 and 135mm lenses.

 

Ithaca portrait for Sierra Magazine

This was a fun one, a quick portrait session in golden hour and then next to a whale skeleton, what more could you ask for?

Sierra Magazine asked me to photograph Alexandra Moore in Ithaca, New York. She works at two of the local education centers one that focuses on teaching outdoors in nature and the other that educates on evolution and the history of the earth.

I worked fast as I was attempting to take advantage of the golden hour as much as possible. While the two locations were only a ten minute drive apart, it still made for a tight schedule. I attempted to get as much variety and show off the two moderately different locations in their best light as quickly as possible. 

Check out the article here.

Virtual Reality for Education Week

Virtual reality is one of the neatest and 'wow' inducing experiences to anyone using it. However to someone outside the headset, it is just a person wearing a funny pair of goggles. This was my challenge when asked to photograph Virtual Reality technology being used by researchers in Buffalo, New York to better aid teachers in dealing with classroom issues.

Luckily the amazing editors at Education Week allowed me to take some creative license. I proposed that instead of approaching this with a typical reportage approach, how about we put these people in a neutral background and allow the person and VR goggles take over the frame. My thoughts being that the environment has nothing to do with what these people are experiencing so let's completely remove it.

I'm very happy with the results. I created them using the Profoto B1 lights and a simple green seamless paper taped to the back wall of an office space in the charter school where the program is happening.

View the final story here